SDSU Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Program

SDSU offers a wide range of entrepreneurship courses

Lavin entrepreneurship program students.

Entrepreneurial learning has flourished in the last 20 years at San Diego State University.  With its commitment to promoting interdisciplinary education, SDSU has developed our undergraduate programs that allow students to build upon key competencies while also opening new doors for collaboration. Management majors have the option to pursue an entrepreneurship specialization and a new entrepreneurship minor open to all students has opened access to new learning paths across the campus.

While these new programs have sparked a wave of campus innovation, SDSU is no stranger to fostering successful businesses. SDSU graduates have gone on to found companies like Costco, Volcom, Jack in the Box, Rubios and Sector 9. A new class of businesses has emerged in recent years with fresh start-ups like Shakesmart, Coursekey, and Bold-Brew Coffee leading the way with SDSU undergraduates.

Entrepreneurship students at SDSU are able to develop important competencies through sound curriculum and experiential learning.  You will have the opportunity to compete in business model/plan competitions through VentureStart, showcase your business at Entrepreneur Day, or become a Lavin Entrepreneur and take advantage of mentoring from successful local entrepreneurs. As a student at SDSU you can also join the Entrepreneur Society to network with other like minded students. In addition, the Lavin Center offers an Internship Program to give students the opportunity to gain experience with local businesses.

  • The Entrepreneurship specialization is crafted specifically  within the Management major in the Fowler College of Business. Taking the Specialization in Entrepreneurship as a Management major complements the managing theories and strategies in the core classes with an innovation and entrepreneurial mindset.
    • Program Level SLOs
      • Employ knowledge of the international nature of entrepreneurship.
        • Identify the cultural dimensions that distinguish different countries on work related attitudes.
        • Analyze how different countries require different strategies.
        • Explain how business practices vary in different countries.
      • Analyze, formulate, and develop methods for implementing strategies in established or entrepreneurial organizations.
        • Apply strategic theories and business model frameworks to organizations in a global context.
        • Integrate functional areas into strategic business problems from a general management perspective.
      • Apply ethical frameworks and theories in business situations.
        • Apply 4-6 ethical theories to current business situations.
        • Explain the philosophical arguments for and criticisms of 4-6 ethical theories.
      • Apply leadership theories and competencies in business situations.
        • Describe and apply leadership theories.
        • Analyze the applicability of leadership skills/practices in different situations.
      • Display knowledge of the key elements of the entrepreneurial process including opportunity recognition and evaluation, concept development, resource procurement, and implementation leading to the creation and capture of value.
        • Identify possible sources and characteristics of viable business opportunities.
        • Develop alternative business concepts for pursuing viable opportunities.
        • Identify the types of human, information, and financial resources required for launching and managing a new venture.
      • Identify alternative strategies for capturing the accumulated value of a business venture.
        • Identify the financial requirements and fund raising processes for starting and growing a new venture.
        • Project the financial requirements associated with launching and growing a new venture.
        • Differentiate between the alternative funding sources for a new venture.
        • Analyze the financial sustainability of a new venture.
      • Employ knowledge of the components of a new venture business plan.
        • Identify the key elements of a business plan for the launch of a new venture.
        • Design a business model to generate revenues and profits associated with the launch of a new venture.

 

  • The Business Entrepreneurship Minor is open to students looking to supplement their major with entrepreneurial knowledge and skills. Applicable to all areas of business, an entrepreneurial mindset will help you solve some of your industry’s most pressing problems with creative solutions. Open to students majoring in Business, Hospitality and Tourism, and International Business, the Entrepreneurship minor will challenge your critical thinking skills and give you the confidence to pursue your own ventures.
  • Below is a course map for the Entrepreneurship Minor for Business, Hospitality and Tourism, and International Business Majors.
    • Business Preparation Class:
      • ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Fundamentals
      • Prerequisite accounting course necessary to declare the minor
    • Required Courses:
      • MGT 358 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 460 Business Plan Development * (prerequisite: MGT 358)
    • Entrepreneurship Courses: (1 from the following)
      • MGT 353 - Creativity and Innovation (prerequisite: MGT350)
      • MGT 355 - International Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 452 - Family Business Management
      • MGT 455 - Social Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 459 - Franchise Management
      • FIN 328 - Entrepreneurial Finance (prerequisite: FIN323)
    • Electives (two from the following)
      • BA 404 - Small Business Consulting 
      • COMM 307 - Communication in Professional Settings
      • COMM 371 - Intercultural Communication
      • COMM 406- Organizational Communication  
      • HTM 320 - Hotel Management
      • FIN 321 - Managerial Economics
      • FIN 328 - Entrepreneurial Finance (prerequisite: FIN323)
      • MGT 352 - Human Resource Management
      • MGT 353 - Creativity and Innovation (prerequisite: MGT350)
      • MGT 355 - International Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 452 - Family Business Management
      • MGT 455 - Social Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 459 - Franchise Management  
      • MIS306 - Systems Analysis
      • MIS483 - Networking and Data Communication
      • MKTG 373 - Integrated Marketing Communications
      • MKTG 377 - Selling Strategy and Practices
      • MKTG 476 - Internet/Interactive Marketing
      • RTM 475 - Commercial Recreation Management
    • Experiential Component
      • Participation in MGT 401 on an approved Entrepreneurship client
      • Participation in the Lavin Venture Start Program
      • Participation in the Lavin Entrepreneur Program
      • Participation in the ZIP Launchpad
      • Participation in a Social Entrepreneurship grant activity
      • An independent study with an Entrepreneurship Professor
      • Participation in a leadership workshop sponsored by Student Life Services on campus
  • One common misconception about entrepreneurship is that it is strictly a business discipline. Entrepreneurship is open to everyone. It’s a minor that encourages innovative thinking to solve problems in a variety of industries. The Entrepreneurship Minor for Non-Business students allows you to pursue your passion while learning how to turn your ideas into a successful venture.  
  • The required courses will help build a core business foundation that can be supplemented with engaging electives to spark your entrepreneurial drive. Below is a course map that will guide you to the completion of the Entrepreneurship Non-Business Minor 
    • Business Preparation Class:
      • ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Fundamentals
      • Prerequisite accounting course necessary to declare the minor
    • Required Courses:
      • MGT 358 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 460 Business Plan Development * (prerequisite: MGT 358)
    • Entrepreneurship Courses: (1 from the following)
      • MGT 353 - Creativity and Innovation (prerequisite: MGT350)
      • MGT 355 - International Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 452 - Family Business Management
      • MGT 455 - Social Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 459 - Franchise Management
      • FIN 328 - Entrepreneurial Finance (prerequisite: FIN323)
    • Electives: (1 from the following)
      • MGT 353 - Creativity and Innovation (prerequisite: MGT350)
      • MGT 355 - International Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 452 - Family Business Management
      • MGT 455 - Social Entrepreneurship
      • MGT 459 - Franchise Management
      • FIN 321 - Managerial Economics
      • FIN 328 - Entrepreneurial Finance (prerequisite: FIN323)
      • BA 323 - Fundamentals of Finance
      • BA 350 - Management and Organization Behavior
      • BA 360 - Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management
      • BA 370 -Marketing
      • MIS306 - Systems Analysis
      • MIS483 - Networking and Data Communication
      • COMM 307 - Communication in Professional Settings
      • COMM 371 - Intercultural Communication
      • COMM 406- Organizational Communication
      • JMS 480 - Principles of Public Relations
      • RTM 475 - Commercial Recreation Management
    • Experiential Component
      • Participation in MGT 401 on an approved Entrepreneurship client
      • Participation in the Lavin Venture Start Program
      • Participation in the Lavin Entrepreneur Program
      • Participation in the ZIP Launchpad
      • Participation in a Social Entrepreneurship grant activity
      • An independent study with an Entrepreneurship Professor
      • Participation in a leadership workshop sponsored by Student Life Services on campus
  • The Music Entrepreneurship and Business program is designed specifically for undergraduate Music majors. It is a partnership between the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts, the Lavin Entrepreneurship Center, and the Fowler College of Business. The Music Entrepreneurship program helps artistically talented individuals to nurture their musical talents while simultaneously developing a comprehensive entrepreneurial skillset.
  • Using music as the foundation, this degree program includes coursework coupled with an experiential component to help students identify how they can translate their artistic talents into entrepreneurial experiences. The program is specifically tailored to students from a variety of musical backgrounds whether they are interested in classical music, jazz studies, or composition.
    • Program Requirements
      • The Music Entrepreneurship and Business program is developed as a rigorous professional music degree. Therefore, only San Diego State University students enrolled as music majors are eligible to apply for admission. Students are admitted on the basis of meeting the academic qualifications and an additional audition process. All students in the program must maintain a GPA of 2.9 or higher and earn a C grade or better in the required courses: Accounting 201 and Music 205B. Please view the Music Entrepreneurship and Business program on the School of Music and Dance website for more information about the core music course requirements.
    • Business Administration and GE Requirements
      • Students complete 15 units of coursework dedicated to business and entrepreneurship. The courses teach students how to identify opportunities, develop a vision for a venture, and provide an introduction to both funding and marketing.
      • The degree is designed to include General Education courses, which students choose from based on their personal interests. The courses available are all applicable for students seeking to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and will be beneficial for students in their future careers. Examples of the non-music offerings include courses related to:
        • Social Media in the Digital Age
        • Economics
        • Theater Management
        • Event Planning
    • Internship Requirement
      • In order to fulfill the experiential component of the program all students are required to complete several internships. The internship opportunities range from on-campus placement to working with nonprofit and/or for profit organizations.
      • For additional information about the Music Entrepreneurship and Business major, please contact the program advisor Donna Conaty at [email protected]
    • Program Design
      • The Lavin Entrepreneur Program is designed around curricula and co-curricular activities. On the curricula side, admitted students are required to enroll in a sequence of four 1-unit courses (one per semester, until graduation). On the co-curricula side, each student will work with an experienced entrepreneurship mentor who will guide them in developing competencies and networks. Additionally, Lavin Entrepreneur students will be invited to participate in special events and company visits in and around the San Diego community. Students will also participate in various entrepreneurial campus events including the Venture Start competition and Entrepreneur Day.
    • Lavin Program Curriculum
      • The Lavin Entrepreneur Program consists of a four-course sequence offered through the College of Business Administration and the Management Department; This four-course sequence is supported by the Lavin Entrepreneurship Center. Each course carries one unit of academic credit (BA 311, BA 312, BA 411 and BA 412).
      • To be admitted into the Lavin Entrepreneur Program students need to be working on Upper Division classes in their major by the time they register for the first required course in the Lavin Program, BA 311. There are no other prerequisites for BA 311. Students must successfully complete BA 311 in order to enroll in BA 312, and so one. The four courses need to be taken in sequential order.

      • There may be situations where Lavin Entrepreneur students opt to participate in a University-approved study abroad program. We encourage international travel for Lavin Entrepreneurship students. In order to keep students on track to complete the Lavin Program we make special course arrangements for students who will not be on the SDSU campus for a semester. This independent study will revolve around curriculum that would be learning in the respective course that students will be missing. Typically, course material is learned through experiential activities within the study board country.  
    • BA 311:
      • In this first course (to be taken during the fall semester), students will be introduced to entrepreneurship as a potential path for future career development. They will begin their journey of developing their entrepreneurial competencies and professional networks. Additionally, students will be introduced to the basics of ideation, opportunity recognition and business model development.
    • BA 312:
      • In this second course (to be taken during the spring semester), students will continue building their entrepreneurial competencies and mindsets. This class emphasizes utilizing entrepreneurship frameworks for business opportunity assessment, ideation and feasibility analysis techniques in ventures, and how to interact and negotiate with strategic partners.  
    • BA 411:
      • In this third course (to be taken during the fall semester), students will focus on developing an idea for launching a new business venture. Throughout the course, students will engage in significant customer development activities that are designed to test assumptions based on market feedback. Using Lean Startup principles, students will learn to make pivots when appropriate, leading to multiple iterations from their original business model.
    • BA 412:
      • In this fourth course (to be taken during the spring), students will focus on company creation activities. Building upon the “pivoted” business model produced at the end of BA 411, students will be exposed to the types of challenges, issues and decisions that must be made while formulating their launch plan. By the end of this course, students will develop and present an investor pitch of their proposed new business venture.